Workplace Diversity

With the world becoming more mobile and diverse, diversity has taken on a new importance in the workplace. This course will help participants understand what diversity is all about, and how they can help create a more diverse world at work and at home.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Explain the definition, terms and history of diversity
  • Describe the meaning of stereotypes and biases, how they develop, and the reasons for your own perspectives
  • List strategies for removing barriers to encouraging diversity for yourself, in the workplace, and in the social community.
  • Use active listening skills to receive messages in a diverse population, employ effective questioning techniques, and communicate with strength
  • Understand the importance of body language, both your own, and that of others, and recognize its importance in interpersonal communications
  • Identify ways to encourage diversity in the workplace, and prevent and discourage discrimination
  • Understand and respond to personal complaints, and develop a support system to manage the resolution process
  • List the steps a manager should take to record a complaint, analyze the situation, and take appropriate resolution action
  • Identify the process an organization must follow to receive and respond to a complaint, and then creating mechanisms to prevent or reduce repeat situations.

Understanding Diversity

  • Related Terms and Concepts
  • A Brief History
  • A Legal Overview
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Understanding Stereotypes

  • Stereotypes vs. Biases
  • Identifying Your Baggage
  • Understanding What This Means
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Breaking Down the Barriers

  • Changing Your Personal Approach
  • Encouraging Workplace Changes
  • Encouraging Social Changes
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Verbal Communication Skills

  • Listening and Hearing; They Aren’t the Same Thing
  • Asking Questions
  • Communicating With Power
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Non-Verbal Communication Skills

  • Body Language
  • The Signals You Send to Others
  • It’s Not What You Say, It’s How You Say It
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Being Proactive

  • Encouraging Diversity in the Workplace
  • Preventing Discrimination
  • Ways to Discourage Discrimination
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Coping with Discrimination

  • Identifying If You Have Been Discriminated Against
  • Methods of Reprisal
  • Choosing a Course of Action
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Dealing with Diversity Complaints as a Person

  • What to Do If You’re Involved in a Complaint
  • Understanding Your Role
  • Creating a Support System
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Dealing with Diversity Complaints as a Manager

  • Recording the Complaint
  • Identifying Appropriate Actions
  • Choosing a Path
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Workplace Harassment

Welcome to the Workplace Harassment workshop. Workplace Harassment can be based on a variety of factors that differ from one person to another, such as race, sex, and disability. This course will give you the tools necessary to recognize harassment in the workplace as well understand your rights
and responsibilities under the law. It will also touch on safety in the workplace, which is in of itself a very important item in any organization.

Three main actions constitute harassment:
1. When someone is doing something to you to make you uneasy.
2. When someone is saying something to you to make you feel uneasy.
3. When someone knowingly puts your life at risk in some way.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Identify the words and actions that constitute harassment.
  • Understand what the law says about harassment.
  • Implement anti-harassment policies.
  • Educate employees and develop anti-harassment policies.
  • Discuss employer and employee’s rights and responsibilities.
  • Address accusations of harassment.
  • Apply proper mediation procedures.
  • Deal with the aftermath of harassment.

The Background

  • The Law
  • Identifying Harassment
  • Anti-Harassment Policies
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Developing an Anti-Harassment Policy

  • An Anti-Harassment Policy: What Should Be Covered
  • How Model Policies Work
  • Steps to a Healthy Work Place
  • Educating Employees
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Policies in the Workplace

  • Anti-Harassment Policy Statements
  • Employee’s Rights and Responsibilities
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Proper Procedures in the Workplace

  • If You are Being Harassed
  • If You are Accused of Harassing
  • The Investigation
  • Remedies
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

False Allegations

  • How to Address the Situation
  • Confidentiality
  • Monitoring the Situation
  • Retaliation
  • Appeals
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Other Options

  • Union Grievance Procedures
  • Mediation: Getting Help from Outside Organization
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Sexual Harassment

  • Defining Sexual Harassment
  • Elements of Harassment
  • Common Scenarios
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Mediation

  • What is Mediation
  • Deciding if it is Right
  • How to Implement
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Conflict Resolution

  • How to Resolve the Situation
  • Seeing Both Sides
  • Deciding the Consequence
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Workplace Violence

Workplace harassment is illegal and destructive to any organization. It is important to treat everyone in the workplace with respect and dignity. Workplace harassment must be identified, discouraged, and prevented in order to keep a hostile work environment from developing. Left unchecked, harassment can escalate into violence. Workplace harassment training is essential to the welfare of all businesses and their employees.

Allowing workplace harassment to continue will cause legal problems while destroying company morale. Many people are uncertain about what constitutes harassment, and they are confused when their actions are pointed out as demeaning. Legally, harassment is any word, gesture, or action that offends people or makes them feel uncomfortable or intimidated. You never know how sensitive people are, so never say or do anything if you are not sure how it will be received.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Define workplace violence.
  • Understand bullies and how to avoid hiring them.
  • Create a risk assessment and understand how to handle violence.
  • Recognize social and business responsibility.
  • Develop relevant policies and procedures.
  • Learn how to investigate complaints.

What Is Workplace Harassment?

  • How to Identify
  • Costs to Your Business
  • Legal
  • Psychological
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Identifying the Bully

  • Abusive Workplace Behaviors
  • Bullying and Personality Disorders
  • Narcissism
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

How to Handle Workplace Violence

  • Types of Behavior
  • Target the Behavior, Not the Person
  • Implement an Action Plan
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Risk Assessment (I)

  • Understanding Anger and Aggression
  • Defusing & De-escalating Strategies
  • Communication Skills
  • Tactical Options
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Risk Assessment (II)

  • Identifying the Hazard
  • Assessing the Risk
  • Controlling the Risk
  • Evaluating & Review
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Being the Victim

  • What is Not Considered Bullying
  • Steps to Take
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Checklist for Employers

  • 4 Step Process
  • Addressing All Employees
  • Code of Ethics
  • Policy and Procedures
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Interview Process

  • Identify a Bully in the Interview Process
  • Warning Signs
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Investigation Process

  • Advising Your Supervisor
  • Lodging the Complaint
  • Initial Response
  • The Investigation
  • The Findings
  • Review & Closure
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Universal Safety Practices

The importance of safety cannot be overstated. Every organization is responsible for the safety of employees while they are working. In 2015, OSHA estimated safety problems cost companies $1 billion a week. Understanding and universal safety practices and how to implement them will help keep everyone protected while ensuring the company’s financial security.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand the importance and legal responsibilities of safety
  • Perform risks assessments
  • Establish a safety program
  • Monitor safety
  • Communicate safety policies

The Importance of Safety

  • Legal Responsibilities
  • Risks
  • Benefits
  • Setting the Example
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Fire Risk

  • Causes and Types
  • Assessment
  • Prevention
  • Communication
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Sound

  • Levels of Noise
  • Assessment
  • Risks
  • PPE or Environmental Changes
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Chemical and Electrical Hazards

  • Assess Chemicals Used
  • Inform
  • Control Exposure
  • Electrical Dangers
  • Policies and Controls
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Ergonomics

  • Common Ergonomic Related Injuries
  • Assess Risks
  • Equipment Changes
  • Keep the Distractions Away
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Workplace Violence

  • Identify Stressors and Triggers
  • Substance Abuse
  • Report Policies
  • Training and Emergency Plans
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Transportation

  • Assess Transportation
  • Onsite
  • Off-site
  • Policies to Prevent Injury
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Machinery

  • Identify Machines and Their Risks
  • Establish Safeguards
  • Limit Use
  • Care and Maintenance
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Safety Program

  • Risk Assessment
  • Establish Goals and Objectives
  • Develop Policies and Procedures
  • Training
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Safety in the Workplace

Those who are in management are responsible for protecting the safety of their employees. Workplace safety, however, is the responsibility of everyone in an organization. Companies have legal obligations to meet certain safety requirements, but many go further than the minimum obligations. Safety standards and procedures must be put in place, and everyone needs to follow the standards in order for them to be effective.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Define workplace safety.
  • Understand legal responsibilities associated with a safe work environment.
  • Create a safety plan and identify hazards.
  • Recognize the role of management.
  • Develop training procedures.
  • Learn how to implement a safety plan.

An Overview

  • Work Safety and Health Legislations
  • Roles & Duties
  • Safety Planning
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Types of Hazards

  • Computer Workstations
  • Ergonomics
  • Fire Prevention
  • Fitness & Wellness
  • Heat Stress
  • Stress
  • Violence
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Managers Role

  • Promoting & Enforcing Safety Standards
  • Elements of a Health and Safety Program
  • Responsibilities
  • Corporate Culture
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Training

  • Reasons for Training
  • Definition
  • Orientation
  • On the Job Training
  • Safety Meetings
  • Planning and Conducting a Training Session
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Stress Management

  • Altering
  • Avoiding
  • Accepting
  • Relaxation Techniques
  • Using Routines to Reduce Stress
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Workplace Violence

  • What is Workplace Violence?
  • Identifying
  • Addressing
  • Implementing a Workplace Harassment Policy
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Identifying Your Company Hazards

  • Conducting an Inspection
  • Prioritizing Deficiencies
  • Report & Following Up
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Drug & Alcohol Abuse

  • For Employees
  • For Managers or Supervisors
  • When to Address
  • Implementing a “No Tolerance” Rule
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Writing the Safety Plan

  • Management Involvement
  • Responsibility
  • Employee Involvement
  • Follow Through with Accident Investigations
  • Training of Employees
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Health and Wellness at Work

Health and wellness are important aspects in anyone’s life. Having employees who are happy and healthy is important in a company. Employees who are happy are more productive, and stay employed longer, with the company. Having a health and wellness program to help those employees stay healthy helps you as an employer, and the employee.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Access Health and Wellness Program Needs
  • Plan a Health and Wellness Program
  • Implement a Health and Wellness Program
  • Maintain a Health and Wellness Program

Definition of a Health and Wellness Program

  • What is a Health and Wellness Program?
  • Productivity
  • Cost of Health Care
  • Costs of Absenteeism
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Types of Health and Wellness Programs

  • Health Behaviors
  • Health Screenings and Maintenance
  • Mental Health
  • Physical Injuries
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Health Behavior Programs

  • Increasing Physical Activity
  • Nutrition & Weight Loss
  • Tobacco Cessation
  • Substance Abuse Treatment
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Health Screenings and Maintenance Programs

  • Preventative Care Screenings
  • Cancer Screenings
  • Annual Examinations
  • Maintenance Programs
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Mental Health Programs

  • Stress Management
  • Support Groups
  • Counseling
  • Awareness & Education
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Evaluate the Need

  • Review Current and Previous Programs
  • Environmental Factors
  • Identify Common Health Conditions and Procedures
  • Review Company Information Pertaining to Employee Health
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Planning Process

  • Form a Health and Wellness Team or Committee
  • Define Goals
  • Budget
  • Programs and Policies
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Implementation

  • Get Management Support
  • Test It Out
  • Get the Word Out
  • Incentives
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Create a “Culture of Wellness”

  • Accessible Healthy Eating Options
  • Give Them a Break
  • Alcohol, Drug, and Smoke-Free Work Environment
  • Eliminate Hazards
  • Case Study
  • Assessment