Magnetic Customer Experience

Dr. Chip R. Bell leads us through his Magnetic Customer Experience course and has helped many Fortune 100 companies dramatically enhance their bottom lines and marketplace reputations through innovative customer-centric strategies that address the needs of today’s picky, fickle, vocal customers. Dr. Bell’s keynotes reveal the best practices from the organizations leading the customer loyalty charge, giving audiences powerful cutting-edge ideas and unique strategies they can immediately put into practice.

Outline of Lessons

Women in Leadership

Women make up almost half the US workforce, yet they are promoted to leadership positions at a rate far lower than are their male colleagues. What accounts for this leadership gap? How can organizations foster and develop women leaders? Studies show that having women in leadership positions brings many benefits to an organization, including greater accountability and a culture of work-life balance. Yet it can be difficult to determine the barriers to women’s advancement, and even more difficult to surmount them. Learning how to foster and develop women as leaders not only benefits individual employees, but can benefit your entire organization.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Discuss the barriers women face in entering leadership positions
  • Understand the importance of developing women leaders
  • Determine steps your organization can take to foster women leaders
  • Understand the benefits of developing women leaders
  • Apply the principles of fostering women leaders to your own organization

Women and the Workforce

  • 50% of the Population
  • 60% of College Degree Earners
  • 47% of the US Workforce
  • 52% of Professional Jobs
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

The Leadership Gap

  • Women are Underrepresented in Leadership
  • Women in Executive Positions
  • Women in Finance, Health Care, and Law
  • Historical Trends
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Barriers to Women’s Leadership

  • Gender Differences are Overemphasized
  • Gender Differences are Undervalued
  • Women Lack Professional Networks
  • Work and Family Conflict
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Traits of Women’s Management

  • Women Lead By Uniting Diverse Groups
  • Women Value Work-Life Balance
  • Women Value Interpersonal Relationships
  • Women Value Accountability
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Benefits of Women’s Leadership

  • Greater Collaboration
  • Culture of Work-Life Balance
  • Culture of Accountability
  • Assists in Recruiting Millennials
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Nurture Women’s Leadership

  • Actively Recruit Women
  • Create and Encourage Networking Opportunities
  • Pair Women with Mentors in Leadership
  • Create and Encourage Training Opportunities
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Actively Recruit Women

  • Discover Your Barriers to Hiring
  • Discover Your Barriers to Retention
  • Recruit via Women’s Organizations
  • Create and Promote a Woman-Friendly Culture
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Encourage Networking Opportunities

  • Create a Women’s Networking Group
  • Encourage Women to Join Organizations
  • Networking Builds Confidence
  • Networking and Recruiting
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Pair Women with Mentors

  • Benefits of Mentoring
  • Think Creatively
  • Incorporate Mentoring at Every Stage
  • Encourage Women to Mentor
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Team Building Through Chemistry

Teams are unavoidable in any business. The key to successful team building is addressing the importance of chemistry between team members. It is not enough to have a group of people work on a project; people have to connect and balance each others’ strengths. By staying aware of the chemistry as you build the group, you will increase the chance of avoiding pitfalls and developing a sense of unity.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand the team development model
  • Identify team chemistry
  • Create vision and goals
  • Appreciate diversity
  • Manage conflict

Understanding Teams

  • What Is the Definition of a Team?
  • How Do People Feel about Being on Teams?
  • Why Do Teams Fall Apart?
  • Examples of Successful Teams
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Team Development Model

  • Forming
  • Norming
  • Storming
  • Performing
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Chemistry in Teams

  • What Is Chemistry?
  • Factors that Influence Chemistry
  • Examples
  • Roles of Leadership
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Diversity

  • Advantages
  • Complexity
  • Conflicts
  • Encourage Individuality
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Vision and Goals

  • Creating Vision
  • Shared Vision
  • SMART Goals
  • Collaboration
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Roles

  • Establishing Roles
  • Taking
  • Making
  • Avoid Power Struggles
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Leadership Functions

  • Set the Tone
  • Conflict Management
  • Direct, Don’t Order
  • Encourage
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Develop Cohesion

  • Sense of Exclusivity
  • Connect Beyond Work
  • Outside Competition
  • Focus on Consensus
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Build Relationships

  • Respect
  • Empathy
  • Open Communication
  • Share Credit
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Risk Assessment and Management

Risk assessment and management is essential for the success of any business. However, many companies do not always take the necessary precautions, which leads to disaster. Successfully managing risks will prevent mistakes, which leads to a safer work environment, happier employees, and increased productivity. Following a few basic steps will place your organization on the path to success.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Identify hazards and risks
  • Update control measures
  • Grasp the fundamentals of accident reports
  • Identify risk management techniques
  • Outline a disaster recovery plan
  • Communicate to the organization

Identifying Hazards and Risks

  • What Is a Hazard?
  • What Is a Risk?
  • Consult with Employees
  • Likelihood Scale
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Seeking Out Problems Before They Happen (I)

  • Unique to Your Business
  • Walk Around
  • Long Term and Short Term
  • Common Issues
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Seeking Out Problems Before They Happen (II)

  • Ask “What would happen if … ?”
  • External Events
  • Worst Case Scenarios
  • Consequence Scale
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Everyone’s Responsibility

  • See It, Report It!
  • If It’s Not Safe, Don’t Do It
  • Take Appropriate Precautions
  • Communicating to the Organization
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Tracking and Updating Control Measures

  • What Is a Control Measure?
  • Your Business Procedures
  • Are They Adequate?
  • Updating and Maintaining
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Risk Management Techniques

  • Reduce the Risk
  • Transfer the Risk
  • Avoid the Risk
  • Accept the Risk
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

General Office Safety and Reporting

  • Accident Reports
  • Accident Response Plans
  • Emergency Action Plan
  • Training and Education
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Business Impact Analysis

  • Gather Information
  • Identify Vulnerabilities
  • Analyze Information
  • Implement Recommendations
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Disaster Recovery Plan

  • Make It Before You Need It
  • Test, Update, and Repeat
  • Hot, Warm, and Cold Sites
  • Keep Documentation Simple and Clear
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Self Leadership

As we grow, we learn to become leaders. Being a leader is natural for some, and learned for others. No matter how we have become a leader, it is important to remember we must lead ourselves before we lead others. Take the time to motivate yourself and realize that you can do it.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Understand what self-leadership is
  • Motivate yourself
  • Set goals
  • Reward yourself when positive things happen
  • Think positively

What Is Self-Leadership?

  • Sources
  • Before Action
  • During
  • After Action
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Motivators

  • Need for Autonomy
  • Self-Efficacy
  • External Factors
  • Internal Factors
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Behavior Focus (I)

  • Focusers and Reminders
  • Cues
  • Self-Observation
  • Goal Setting
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Behavior Focus (II)

  • Purpose
  • Reward
  • Punishment
  • Practice
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Natural Rewards

  • Definition
  • Competence
  • Purpose and Self-Control
  • Life Activities
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Constructive Thinking

  • Positive Thinking
  • Self-Talk
  • Aware of Personal Beliefs and Assumptions
  • Opportunity Thinking
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Well-Being (I)

  • Emotional Intelligence
  • Stress Management
  • Optimism
  • Fun and Happiness
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Well-Being (II)

  • Fitness
  • Diet
  • Sleep
  • Personal Effectiveness
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Individuality

  • Personality
  • Locus of Control
  • Self-Monitor
  • Autonomy
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Servant Leadership

Servant leadership can seem like a contradicting term, but it is becoming a very popular tool in many businesses. Servant leadership is a philosophy that involves focusing on others (i.e. your employees), and focus on their success, and in turn build better professional relationships that can benefit both manager and employee. Servant leadership shows that managers can be great leaders while boosting their employee’s confidence and further their success at the same time.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Define servant leadership
  • Know the characteristics of servant leadership
  • Recognize the barriers of servant leadership
  • Learn to be a mentor and a motivator
  • Practice self-reflection

What is Servant Leadership?

  • A Desire to Serve
  • Knowing to Share the Power
  • Putting Others First
  • Risks of Poor Contract Management
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Leadership Practices

  • Democratic Leadership Style
  • Laissez-Faire Style
  • Leading by Example
  • Path-Goal Theory
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Share the Power

  • Being Empathetic
  • Learn to Delegate
  • Their Success is Your Success
  • Know When to Step In
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Characteristics of a Servant Leader

  • Listening Skills
  • Persuasive Powers
  • Recognizes Opportunities
  • Relates to Employees
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Barriers to Servant Leadership

  • Excessive Criticism
  • Doing Everything Yourself
  • Sitting on the Sidelines
  • Demanding from Employees
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Building a Team Community

  • Identify the Group Needs
  • Complement Member Skills
  • Encourage Communication
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Be a Motivator

  • Make it Challenging
  • Provide Resources
  • Ask for Employee Input
  • Offer Incentives
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Be a Mentor

  • Establish Goals
  • Know When to Praise or Criticize
  • Create a Supportive Environment
  • Create an Open Door Policy
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Training Future Leaders

  • Offer Guidance and Advice
  • Identify Their Skill Sets
  • Methods of Feedback
  • Communicate with Power
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Practical Leadership and Influence

They say that leaders are born, not made. While it is true that some people are born leaders, some leaders are born in the midst of adversity. Often, simple people who have never had a leadership role will stand up and take the lead when a situation they care about requires it. A simple example is parenting. When a child arrives, many parents discover leadership abilities they never knew existed in order to guide and protect their offspring. There are countless war stories of simple GI’s and sailors who rose to a challenge on their own in the heat of battle.

Clearly, leadership potential exists within each of us. That potential can be triggered by outside events, or it can be learned by exploring ourselves from within. This training takes the latter approach. Once you learn the techniques of true leadership, you will be able to build the confidence it takes to take the lead. The more experience you have acting as a genuine leader, the easier it will be for you. It is never easy to take the lead, as you will need to make decisions and face challenges, but it can become natural and rewarding.

Leadership is not telling others what to do. Leadership is inspiring others to do what needs to be done. Many people around the world who are in leadership positions are not leaders. Dictators call themselves leaders but they are not – they are tyrants. There have been many presidents of the United States, but few were real leaders. Genuine leaders take a stand and motivate others to join them in a noble purpose. One such leader was Abraham Lincoln, who ended slavery in the United States. Another was John F. Kennedy, who inspired a nation to go to the moon within a decade, and it did. General Patton had a completely different but no less effective leadership style. What is it that makes a leader, and what separates the good from the great? This course will explore different leadership theories and examine what makes a great leader.

Influence is subtle, yet incredibly powerful. You can order someone to do a task, but you cannot order them to do their best. It simply does not work and usually has the opposite effect. You can influence people to do their best by providing a strong, motivating example in addition to positive reinforcement. Leadership addresses tasks, while influence addresses attitudes and awareness. Influence is the soul of leadership.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning that the learning occurs more easily and rapidly. By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Define “leadership”
  • Explain the Great Man Theory
  • Explain the Trait Theory
  • Understand Transformational Leadership
  • Understand the people you lead and how to adapt your leadership styles
  • Explain leading by Directing
  • Explain leading by Coaching
  • Explain leading by Participating
  • Explain leading by Delegating
  • Kouzes and Posner
  • Conduct a personal inventory
  • Create an action plan
  • Establish personal goals

The Evolution of Leadership

  • Defining Leadership
  • Characteristics of a Leader
  • Leadership Principles
  • A Brief History of Leadership
  • Three Theories of Leadership
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Situational Leadership

  • Situational Leadership: Telling
  • Situational Leadership: Selling
  • Situational Leadership: Participating
  • Situational Leadership: Delegating
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

A Personal Inventory

  • An Introduction to Kouzes and Posner
  • A Personal Inventory
  • Creating an Action Plan
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Modeling the Way

  • Determining Your Way
  • Being an Inspirational Role Model
  • Influencing Others’ Perspectives
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Inspiring a Shared Vision

  • Choosing Your Vision
  • Communicating Your Vision
  • Identifying the Benefit for Others
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Challenging the Process

  • Think Outside the Box
  • Developing Your Inner Innovator
  • Seeing Room for Improvement
  • Lobbying for Change
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Enabling Others to Act

  • Encouraging Growth in Others
  • Creating Mutual Respect
  • The Importance of Trust
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Encouraging the Heart

  • Sharing Rewards
  • Celebrating Accomplishments
  • Making Celebration Part of Your Culture
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Basic Influencing Skills

  • The Art of Persuasion
  • The Principles of Influence
  • Creating an Impact
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Mastering Employee Motivation

Employee Motivation is becoming ever more important in the workplace as time goes on, and everyone agrees that a motivated workforce is far more likely to be a successful workforce. The happier and more professional an employee is, the better the results they will deliver for you. Of course, every employer wants to make sure that they have a workforce who will do their best, but this does not simply mean making the job easy for their employees. In fact, part of the problem of motivation is that where the job is too easy, employees become complacent. There is therefore a challenge for all employers and management in delivering the right balance between a confident, motivated workforce and a workforce which is driven to attain goals. It can be described as a mix between the pleasure of a comfortable working environment and the fear of failure, although in honesty it is more complicated than that equation suggests. Regardless of how it is characterized, it is important to get the right balance in order to ensure that you have a motivated workforce. This manual is designed to show participants the way to get the best out of a confident, motivated set of employees, and to show them how to motivate that group.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. By the end of this course, you will learn about:

  • Defining motivation, an employer’s role in it and how the employee can play a part
  • Identifying the importance of Employee Motivation
  • Identifying methods of Employee Motivation
  • Describing the theories which pertain to Employee Motivation – with particular reference to psychology
  • Identifying personality types and how they fit into a plan for Employee Motivation.
  • Setting clear and defined goals.
  • Identifying specific issues in the field, and addressing these issues and how to maintain this going forward.

A Psychological Approach

  • Herzberg’s Theory of Motivation
  • Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
  • The Two Models and Motivation
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Object-Oriented Theory

  • The Carrot
  • The Whip
  • The Plant
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Using Reinforcement Theory

  • A History of Reinforcement Theory
  • Behavior Modification in Four Steps
  • Appropriate Uses in the Workplace
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Using Expectancy Theory

  • A History of Expectancy Theory
  • Understanding the Three Factors
  • Using the Three Factors to Motivate in the Workplace
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Personality’s Role in Motivation

  • Identifying Your Personality Type
  • Identifying Others’ Personality Type
  • Motivators by Personality Type
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Setting Goals

  • Goals and Motivation
  • Setting SMART Goal
  • Evaluating and Adapting
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

A Personal Toolbox

  • Building Your Own Motivational Plan
  • Encouraging Growth and Development
  • Getting Others to See the Glass Half-Full
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Motivation on the Job

  • The Key Factors
  • Creating a Motivational Organization
  • Creating a Motivational Job
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Addressing Specific Morale Issues

  • Dealing with Individual Morale Problems
  • Addressing Team Morale
  • What to Do When the Whole Company is De-Motivated
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Employee Recognition Best Practices

To a business, an employee recognition program is not a luxury, it is a necessity. With a well-built employee recognition program, companies can improve job retention, employee engagement, team work, reinforcing company values, and more. Employees are more likely to continue employment with a company if they feel they are appreciated. There are many different types of employee recognition programs, and all are beneficial to your employees.

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, you should be able to:

  • Assess the type of Employee Recognition Program(s) your company needs
  • Train leadership to recognize their employees
  • Know when and where recognition is needed
  • Construct a culture of recognition
  • Maintain an effective Employee Recognition Program

The Many Types of Incentive

  • Safety Incentives
  • Years of Service
  • Productivity
  • Attendance & Wellness Incentives
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Designing Employee Recognition Programs

  • Purpose
  • Employee Involvement
  • Budget
  • Keep it Simple
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

How To Get The Buzz Out

  • Be Creative With Designs
  • Paper the Walls
  • Use Social Media
  • Go Mobile!
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Top Five Procedures to Record

  • Identifying Desirable Behaviors
  • Understanding the Goals of the Company
  • Setting Guidelines
  • Providing Recognition Templates
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Creating a Culture of Recognition

  • Keep Your Staff “In the Know”
  • Empower Employees with Peer to Peer Recognition
  • Team Building: Encourage Camaraderie
  • Motivate by Promoting Fun
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

The Best Things In Life Are Free!

  • Put a Spotlight on Employees in Staff Meetings
  • Write it Down
  • Display Your Appreciation
  • Make Work More Comfortable
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

A Small Gesture Goes A Long Way

  • Have a Party!
  • Make a Game of It
  • Reward with Small Gift
  • Give Them a Break
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Pulling Out The Red Carpets

  • Have an Awards Ceremony
  • Win Large Items
  • Vacation
  • Career Advancement
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

The Don’ts of Employee Recognition

  • Don’t Forget About The Art Of The High Five!
  • Don’t Let It Become Boring
  • Popularity Contest or Recognition Program?
  • Make Sure the Prize is Motivational
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Entrepreneurship

So, you want to break into Entrepreneurship? Well, that’s great, but know that it is no easy feat. There are many steps you must take just to prepare yourself to embark on the journey, and once you have started your business, many more steps to maintain the business. This course is designed to give you the tools you need to start, run, and grow a business you can be proud of!

Research has consistently demonstrated that when clear goals are associated with learning, it occurs more easily and rapidly. At the end of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Understand how to start a business
  • Develop a business plan
  • Get financing for your business
  • Hire and train employees
  • Run your business
  • Grow your business

Decide on the Type of Business

  • Is It Feasible?
  • What Are Your Interests?
  • Do You Have the Experience?
  • Are You an Expert?
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

What Is the Market/Competition Like?

  • Is the Venture Lucrative?
  • Is There Competition?
  • How Can You Set Yourself Apart from the Competition?
  • How Is the Customer Prospect?
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Basics of Starting a Business

  • Decide on a Name
  • Legal Structure of the Business
  • Register the Business
  • Keep Track Using a Spreadsheet
  • Hire an Accountant
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Create a Business Plan

  • What Should Be Included in the Business Plan?
  • Gather Documentation
  • Develop a Business Plan Outline
  • Draft a Business Plan
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Get Financing

  • Contact Organizations for Guidance
  • Decide the Type of Financing
  • Shop Around
  • What to Do Once Approved
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Hire Employees

  • Develop Job Descriptions
  • Advertise Positions
  • Interview Candidates
  • Select Candidates
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Training Employees

  • Teach Company Culture
  • Implement Actual Training for the Position
  • Provide Feedback
  • Offer Additional Training, If Necessary
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Market the Business

  • Traditional Marketing
  • Create a Website
  • Social Media
  • Networking Groups
  • Case Study
  • Assessment

Run the Business

  • Procurement
  • Sell! Sell! Sell!
  • How to Manage Cash Flow
  • Budgeting
  • Case Study
  • Assessment